1993 Classic Rock Reviews
1993 Music
In 1993 it seemed like something new and interesting was happening, a rock revolution which once and for all destroyed the hair band virus from the scene. But it was also a time of confusion and false enthusiasm, when new sensations were hatched everywhere only to fall from grace soon after. Still, that year’s album had a nice balance of impressive debuts and releases by long established acts.

We featured albums from the year 1988 during July and August 2013. During this 25th anniversary celebration of this music, we have originally reviewed these albums:

*1993 Album of the Year

Below are further descriptions of each album, in the order that we reviewed them.

March 7, 2013
Candlebox 1993 albumWith their self-titled debut in 1993, Candlebox was one of the last riders of the huge Seattle grunge wave of the early 1990s. Consequently, they were at the vanguard of the post-grunge wave, where this newly labeled “alternative” music was becoming less and less alternative.

Review of Candlebox

March 12, 2013
Counterparts by RushWhile there is a definite break from the pop-leaning, synth-fused sound that had defined the Rush sound since the mid-1980s, their evolution back towards rock was not quite complete on Counterparts. Yet the album was very well received and became their highest charting ever.

Review of Counterparts

March 16, 2013
Vs by Pearl JamPearl Jam‘s second album was originally slated for the title “Five Against One”, which represented the band’s perspective on their struggles trying to make this sophomore record. However, the title was changed shortly before its release to Vs. as a mocking tribute to all the media stories that would compare Pearl Jam against other Seattle-based bands.

Review of Vs.

March 21, 2013
Siamese Dream by Smashing Pumpkins Smashing Pumpkins matured their blend of dream pop, heavy metal, and progressive rock on Siamese Dream, a blockbuster album which eventually sold over six million worldwide. Richly produced, the album is a work of great sonic depth and layered sounds built the “old fashioned” way by using multiple overdubs.

Review of Siamese Dream

March 25, 2013
Get a Grip by Aerosmith reviewAerosmith made an amazing comeback in the late 1980s but with their first release of the 1990s, Get a Grip, the band kind of “jumped the shark” in providing manufactured, crowd-tested anthems with extra vanilla production techniques and cheap, low grade lyrics. Still, it went on to be the band’s best selling album ever.

Review of Get a Grip

April 2, 2013
In Utero by NirvanaFor what turned out to be their final studio album, Nirvana took an extreme anti-production approach with In Utero. To capture a more abrasive and natural sound, the music was recorded quickly with few studio embellishments, so much so that the band’s label almost chose to not release the album in its original state.

Review of In Utero

April 7, 2013
Coverdale-PageThe collaboration of former Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page and former Whitesnake (considered a Zeppelin “clone”) vocalist David Coverdale seemed like an odd one when it started in 1991. But in 1993 the duo released a decent and interesting eponymous album as the “super group” Coverdale-Page.

Review of Coverdale-Page

April 12, 2013
August and Everything After by Counting CrowsOne of the more impressive debuts of 1993, 5August and Everything After by Counting Crows fuses lyrically rich ballads with such long forgotten sonic treasures as the Hammond B-3 organ, the accordion, and the straight-forward strummed acoustic guitar. The album sold over seven million copies and remains the band’s most popular by far.

Review of August and Everything After

April 16, 2013
Out of Body by The HootersOut of Body was the fifth studio album by The Hooters and would be the last before the band’s decade and a half hiatus from recording. This was the first album since the band had expanded to become a six-piece after the addition of vocalist, violinist, and multi-instrumentalist Mindy Jostyn.

Review of Out of Body

April 20, 2013
Hints, Allegations, and Things Left Unsaid by Collective SoulPerhaps the best sounding “demo tape” of the 1990s (if not all time), Collective Soul forged a great sonic mix on their debut Hints Allegations and Things Left Unsaid . The sound took the best of arena-era rock and mixed it with just a sliver of new-era alternative, all forged in the basement studio of budding composer Ed Roland.

Review of Hints, Allegations, and Things Left Unsaid

April 24, 2013
Pablo Honey by Radiohead Radiohead‘s debut album, Pablo Honey, was a promising collection that blends anthemic rock with atmospheric instrumental passages and a triple-guitar attack that is alternately gentle and bracingly noisy. Although the album did not make much critical or a commercial waves upon release, it has gained in stature through the years.

Review of Pablo Honey

April 28, 2013
Tuesday Night Music Club by Sheryl Crow, 1993 Album of the Year
Sheryl Crow‘s official debut was at once brilliant and controversial. In fact, the title Tuesday Night Music Club comes from the assembled studio group who composed and recorded the album together with Crow at the forefront and guitarist Bill Bottrell as producer. Despite the controversy surrounding the album, it is hard to dispute that the music is original, entertaining, and interesting and this is the criteria we use when selecting our Classic Rock Review Album of the Year.

Review of Tuesday Night Music Club

Final 1993 Poll Results
Q: What is the best album of 1993?

1 Hints, Allegations, & Things Left Unsaid by
Collective Soul
27%
2 Vs. by
Pearl Jam
26%
3 In Utero by Nirvana 19%
4 Tuesday Night Music Club by Sheryl Crow 17%
5 Get a Grip by Aerosmith 5%

Conducted on our site, March-April, 2013

Other 1993 Albums of Note

1993 had its share of important albums by established, 1980s carry-overs such as Living Colour, Sting, and U2. It also featured releases by rock legends like Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Robert Plant, Paul McCartney and the final major albums by Billy Joel and The Kinks.

River of Dreams by Billy Joel Rift by Phish Wandering Spirit by Mick Jagger Off the Ground by Paul McCartney Cyberpunk by Billy Idol Stain by Living Colour Are You Gonna Go My Way by Lenny Kravitz Ten Summoner's Tales by Sting Phobia by The Kinks Zooropa by U2  Black Tie White Noise by David Bowie Porno for Pyros Thousand Roads by David Crosby Fate of Nations by Robert Plant Fumbling Towards Ecstasy by Sarah McLachlan The Unfortunate Result of Spare Time by The Badlees Kiss Alive 3 Too Long in Exile by Van Morrison American Caesar by Iggy Pop Bat Out of Hell II: Back Into Hell by Meatloaf Human Wheels by John Mellencamp Yes I Am by Melissa Etheridge The Battle Rages On by Deep Purple I'm Alive by Jackson Browne Superstar Car Wash by Goo Goo Dolls Desire Walks On by Heart The Last Rebel by Lynard Skynard Try Anything Once by Alan Parsons
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